A Strong BES Policy for Workplace BYOD

Written by Seattle News Stations on . Posted in Bes security policy, Blackberry mobile device management

Bes security policy

The blackberry mobile device has long been a favorite of businesses everywhere, which is why developing a Bes security policy has become a priority for many employers. Employers love BlackBerries because they work extremely well for email. It is easy to do email on a BlackBerry because the phone is equipped with a physical QWERTY keyboard. This keyboard is quite user friendly, allowing for easy and fast typing which makes emailing a snap.

Another reason why BlackBerry is a favorite of employers the world over is that the BES, otherwise known as the BlackBerry Enterprise Server, permits BlackBerry users to receive and send both corporate and personal email. As long as a strong BES policy is in place, this can add value to business. While approximately 63 percent of smartphone users access the internet on a daily basis via their mobile devices, 87 percent of BlackBerry users rely on their smartphones to access the web every day.

The BES facilitates a more fluid work environment where the boundaries between the office and home disappear. This proves to be an excellent enhancer of employee productivity. These days, many companies are adopting a BES policy as a strategy for blackberry mobile device management. A BES policy allows employees to benefit from the convenience of using one device for both work and personal email while also protecting proprietary information. Thus, a good BES policy keeps the interests of both workers and management in mind.

As we move further into the 21st century, more and more organizations are relying on BYOD, which stands for Bring Your Own Device. Research In Motion, the parent company of BlackBerry, has high hopes that the spread of BYOD policies will elevate future sales of the new BlackBerry 10 which came out in January of 2013. Many employers are encouraging the use of the BlackBerry 10 as a component of a sound BYOD and Bes policy.

Comments (7)

  • Nicholas Ross

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    I personally wish that there was less fluidity between work and home. When I am at work, I want to work. When I am at home, I want to do… other things.

    Reply

  • Dave Dunn

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    Is there actually a way to make absolutely sure that proprietary information will not get into the wrong hands as a result of employee mobile phone use? That seems a bit risky to me.

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  • Brent Harper

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    Is there actually a way to make absolutely sure that proprietary information will not get into the wrong hands as a result of employee mobile phone use? That seems a bit risky to me.

    Reply

  • Ron Romero

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    Is there actually a way to make absolutely sure that proprietary information will not get into the wrong hands as a result of employee mobile phone use? That seems a bit risky to me.

    Reply

  • Jon Franklin

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    Is there actually a way to make absolutely sure that proprietary information will not get into the wrong hands as a result of employee mobile phone use? That seems a bit risky to me.

    Reply

  • Madison Gilbert

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    Is there actually a way to make absolutely sure that proprietary information will not get into the wrong hands as a result of employee mobile phone use? That seems a bit risky to me.

    Reply

  • Harvey Murray

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    Is there actually a way to make absolutely sure that proprietary information will not get into the wrong hands as a result of employee mobile phone use? That seems a bit risky to me.

    Reply

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